Chuck Strozier Books

The New World of Self book cover with photo of Heinz Kohut

By Charles B. Strozier,
Konstantine Pinteris, Kathleen Kelley, and Deborah Cherr

The New World of Self

Heinz Kohut is a foundational thinker who revolutionized psychoanalytic theory and the practice of psychotherapy. In a burst of creativity from the mid-1960s until his death in 1981, he reimagined the field in a way that made it open, mutual, relational, and inclusive. His conceptualization of a holistic self that is in an ongoing relationship with others represented a paradigm shift from the purely intrapsychic Freudian model of id/ego/superego..

Author

Chuck Strozier

It is an act of outrageous narcissism to list one’s accomplishments for a website such as the one you are reading. The best I can do in this narrative portion of my self presentation is try an occupy that liminal space between naming what I think I have done of note in my life without puffing myself up like a balloon to be popped.

Heinz Kohut: The Making of a Psychoanalyst

Kohut’s “self psychology” re-imagined psychanalysis as a theory and practice based on empathy. Many had flailed at the stout walls of classical ego psychology. It took someone from the inside, a man who at first had firmly embraced orthodoxy, to think things from the ground up,

This impeccably researched book, written in a clear elegant style that clarifies even complicated ideas carries us along like an exciting novel.

- Sophie Freud, American Journal of Psychotherapy

Lincoln’s Quest For Union

Lincoln’s Quest for Union gives a probing account of Lincoln’s inner life–from his childhood in Kentucky and Indiana, through his youth and adulthood in Illinois, amid years of struggle finding himself, through his ascent to the presidency when he guided the nation and articulated for the country the meaning of the Civil War. 

This is a remarkable book with extraordinary insights about the inner life of Abraham Lincoln. It will be read and studied for years to come, for Charles Strozier brings to every chapter the very qualities that Lincoln himself possessed—empathy, wisdom, balance, and creativity.

- Doris Kearns Goodwin

Your Friend Forever

On April 15, 1837, a “long, gawky” Abraham Lincoln walked into Joshua Speed’s dry-goods store in Springfield, Illinois, and asked what it would cost to buy the materials for a bed. Speed said seventeen dollars, which Lincoln didn’t have. He asked for a loan to cover that amount until Christmas. Speed was taken with his visitor, but, as he said later,

Charles B. Stozier long ago established himself as a pioneering student of Lincoln’s inner life. He now returns to the field with the first comprehensive study of Lincoln’s close friendship with Joshua Speed. If history is any guide, Strozier’s compelling account of this crucial aspect of the Lincoln biography is sure to become definitive.

-James Oakes, author of The Crooked Path to Abolition

Until The Fires Stopped Burning

Based on the testimony of survivors, bystanders, spectators, and victim’s friends and families, Until the Fires Stopped Burning brings much-needed clarity to the conscious and unconscious meaning of 9/11 and its relationship to historical disaster, apocalyptic experience, unnatural death, and the psychological endurance of trauma.

This is the only work on 9/11 to describe people’s experiences in depth while at the same time providing a broad sense of the human impact on he whole event.

- Robert Lifton

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chuck@charlesbstrozier.com

Heinz Kohut: The Making of a Psychoanalyst

Kohut’s “self psychology” re-imagined psychanalysis as a theory and practice based on empathy. Many had flailed at the stout walls of classical ego psychology. It took someone from the inside, a man who at first had firmly embraced orthodoxy, to think things from the ground up,

 

"This impeccably researched book, written in a clear elegant style that clarifies even complicated ideas carries us along like an exciting novel."

– Sophie Freud, American Journal of Psychotherapy